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The race between humans and robots as teachers

In this series of articles, we will explore the future of artificial intelligence in education. We will argue that a cooperation between both teachers and artificial intelligence will be most beneficial for the best learning experience for humans. We will reflect and look at challenges like privacy with collecting a vast amount of data about learning. Finally, we will talk about the future and where we believe education is heading in both chess and other domains.

Part 1: Introduction

Professor Li Yining, one of China's most noted economists and government advisors, often tells his students an adaptation of the famous Aesop story about the turtle and the hare. The original story tells about a race between both animals. Halfway the race the hare took a nap because he was way ahead of the turtle and thought he would win anyway. His overestimation of himself cost him the race because he fell asleep. The turtle was able to catch up with the hare and won the race. Yining always asks his students: "Do you think they only hold one race?"


Part 2: What do these scary monsters actually look like?

The Sirens are among the most famous creatures in Greek mythology. With their beautiful voices, they enchant sailors nearing their shore. Luring them astray to their island and let the ships shipwreck on the reef of the island. The story about the Sirens could be used as a metaphor about the media and news coverage of computerization in the workforce. The media use their beautiful voices to inform the public. They however - just like the Sirens - can lead people astray with the information they give. The stories they write are sometimes a bit of doom and gloom.


Part 3: Flashcards

Imagine you are a chess teacher and it's Monday morning 9 AM. Your day starts and your first private student comes in. As a teacher, you prepared a lesson about double attacks, a tactical motif in chess. An interesting question is: why a lesson about double attacks? Why not a lesson about another tactical motif or the endgame? How do you decide as a teacher what to teach your students? And why?